Electricity Prices

Electricity choice is pushing prices down for the majority of residences in Ohio. Several years ago Ohio passed energy restructuring laws that allowed for competitive electricity in the state’s largest utility service areas. Those laws are now paying dividends as the number of electricity companies offering service in Ohio is increasing, as well as the number of participating energy shoppers.

The biggest electricity service area in Ohio is AEP, which includes Ohio Power and Columbus Southern Power. The utility serves over one million residential electricity customers, of which 25% are currently buying their power from a competitive energy supplier. Those who have taken the time to compare AEP Ohio electricity prices have been able to substantially reduce their electric bills. The savings have been significant reaching as high as 17% versus the AEP Ohio price to compare default rate.

As the Ohio electricity choice market continues to mature consumers can expect to see falling prices. The state is seeing the number of energy companies offering service to Ohio residences increase, giving customers more product options and lower rates. The switch percentage is above 70% for some of Ohio’s service utility areas, showing that the people of Ohio have accepted and welcomed electricity choice.

Below are competitive rates for Ohio Power and Columbus Southern Power, all prices are updated daily.



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On June 1, 2013 Pennsylvania Power & Light customers who have remained on the electric default rate got a significant rate increase that will show up when these consumers receive their electric bills in July. The PP&L price to compare rate jumped from 7.4 cents to 8.227 cents as calendar pages turned from May to June. PP&L electric rates have been very volatile since the start of Pennsylvania electricity choice. At times competitive rates have showed savings as high as 25% versus the PPL price to compare, while in recent months few competitive suppliers were able to offer savings versus the default price.

The PP&L price to compare is the default rate consumers pay for generation and transmission charges who do not shop for competitive power. The price changes every three months and is often very difficult to predict. Even when PP&L does post an estimated price to compare for the next three month period it has proved to not be an accurate forecast. The majority of PPL customers who have done an electricity switch and who are buying their power from an alternative supplier do so because of the savings they get at that specific time period. However, for more customers the benefits of electricity choice is becoming just as much about price security and certainty as the instant savings. Consumers who locked in fixed electric rates last fall to save money during that time may have been slightly disappointed when PPL announced a default rate reduction from March through May of this year. However now they are saving money once again when electric bills will be at a premium in the hot summer months. These customers do not have to be concerned with this PPL rate hike or the potential of another one in three months since they locked in a low fixed electricity rate.

As of May 29, 2013 over 527,000 residential PP&L electricity customers are purchasing their power from competitive energy companies. This number actually decreased slightly from the all time high achieved in March of 2013 due to the low PPL default rates over the last several months. With the recent rate hike in effect that number is expected to grow. With 42.8% of the residential class active in electricity shopping the idea of electric choice in Pennsylvania is no longer a foreign idea. The market has become once of the most competitive energy choice markets in the country with new suppliers entering almost every month offering low electricity prices and sometimes additional incentives.

Current competitive PP&L electricity prices can be found below.


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Electric choice is working in Connecticut as competitive electricity prices continue to fall for United Illuminating power customers . It is hard to argue against 15% savings, which is what current (Summer 2011) low electric rates in the United Illuminating (UI) territory are yielding for customers who have switched off of default rates and moved towards competitive electricity prices.

UI customers are still relatively new to the idea of receiving multiple electric rate offers. Though Connecticut electricity has been deregulated for some years now, competitive electricity offers were not offered to residential customers until just a few years ago. Savings were small at first, but with the UI Generation Service Charge (GSV) rates recently increasing and wholesale rates remaining low, competitive electric companies have been able to offer attractive electricity prices.

UI electricity customers can be reassured that selecting a low electric rate from a alternative supplier will not upset UI or end the business relationship. The United Illuminating Company is in the business of delivering power, and they continue to charge regulated rates to all of their customers for this service. They also continue to send their customers the monthly electric bill. The generation default rate that customers pay with UI is passed through to competitive electricity companies who have won auctions for the right to service default paying customers. Believe it or not, even if you haven’t selected a competitive supplier in Connecticut, you are already paying a competitive supplier through default service.

Electricity competition is working in the United Illuminating Company service area because customers can choose from a variety of electric suppliers at electricity prices that are lower than default rates.

Current Low Electric Rate for United Illuminating Customers:


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Residential electricity customers of the New Jersey utility company Jersey Central Power & Light (JCP&L) are receiving competitive offers for the first time.

Though JCP&L has had a deregulated retail energy market for several years, electricity companies were slow to enter the market due to low JCP&L electric default rates.  JCPL sets their default rates for their roughly 972,000 electric residential customers by holding an auction the previous year.  Between 2004 and 2008 energy prices were in a consistent upswing.  This made it difficult for competitive electric companies to offer discounted rates as they were always buying in a market where the price was higher than the default rates established in previous months.

With a general downturn in electricity prices in 2010, competitive electric companies are finally able to offer residential customers attractive electricity offers.

As competition has increased in the JCPL market some electricity companies have focused their marketing efforts on promotions and sign-up bonuses.

Fixed rate offers for terms as little as 4 months and as high as 24 months with a $75 gift card can be found here.

Variable month to month rates with a $50 cashback bonus can be found here.


Fixed electric rates will protect customers from JCPL electric rate increases that are expected to occur on June 1, 2011.

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NJ Electricity Prices and Savings

December 19, 2010

Seven years after New Jersey officially deregulated their electricity market, residences of the state are finally seeing competitive electric rates that can save them real dollars off of their monthly electric bill. If you are a customer of PSE&G, JCP&L, Rockland Electric, or Atlantic City Electric, savings can be found by shopping the competitive electricity […]

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TX Electric Rates

November 9, 2010

Electric rates in Texas are down to levels that have not been seen since 2002 when the electricity market first became deregulated.  The downward trend in electricity prices has been a result of falling natural gas prices throughout 2010. Both residential and commercial electric customers are benefiting from the lower electric rates.  Residential customers are […]

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Find Lower JCPL Electric Rates

August 13, 2010

Jersey Central Power and Light (JCPL) electricity customers are seeing some of the lowest electric rates since the utility deregulated back in 2003. The basic generation service, the JCPL default rate, will be $0.110285 per kilowatt hour from October 1, 2010 through May 31, 2011 for small and medium businesses.  From now through the end […]

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Heat Wave Causes Electricity Prices to Spike in PJM

July 14, 2010

  The heat wave that was present in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic last week caused a spike in electricity demand which in return increased hourly prices in the electric wholesale market.  Weather is the key variable for electricity demand.  Warmer than average weather causes an increase in demand as people turn their air conditioning down, forcing […]

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Hurricane Season May Raise Electric Rates

July 1, 2010

The National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center is expecting a rough Hurricane season in 2010 that may have a negative effect on retail electricity prices.  Electric rates in the majority of competitive electric markets have a direct correlation with natural gas prices.  Bad hurricane seasons result in a decline in natural gas production that eventually pushes […]

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CLP Electric Rate Update

June 29, 2010

Competitive electric rates in Connecticut remain well below the price to compare default rates of CLP.  Despite this, only 27% of customers (residential, commercial, and Industrial) have chosen an alternative supplier. Small and medium commercial customers in the CLP territory on default service (i.e. have not chosen a competitive supplier) are paying a rate of […]

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